Activities

Taking care - Middle Neolithic


The use of pits dug into the ground as airtight tanks for storing agricultural products, especially grain, is very frequent in prehistoric settlements and has been a common practice in traditional peasant groups.

From experimental studies it has been shown that these pits, once emptied their contents, were unusable for a second use as grain containers. Like what happens in almost all sites with such structures, the archaeological data from Neolithic villages of northeast Iberia show that, once emptied, these pits were filled with waste materials like ceramic useless vessels, broken instruments or leftovers of cooked food, that can be documented  by means of animal bones and other preserved organic remains.

The intentional dumping of these remains into pits, which could be compared with our current concept of garbage, indicates hygienical habits since the separation of these structures from the living areas avoided that organic material, that could give rise to processes of putrefaction, will cumulate in working and consumption areas or the spaces for daily rest and prevented also the accumulation of materials no longer in use.

Hombre vertiendo desechos en una fosa vertedero. Después se cubre con tierra para evitar olores y mantener unas condiciones de higiene en el poblado. Ilustración: Francesc Ràfols

Hombre vertiendo desechos en una fosa vertedero. Después se cubre con tierra para evitar olores y mantener unas condiciones de higiene en el poblado. Ilustración: Francesc Ràfols


Women in...

Objects

INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES TO GENDER ARCHAEOLOGY - University of Tübingen (Alemanya)

The Pastwomen Network co-organizes the International Seminar "Interdisciplinary Approaches to Gender Archaeology" at the University of Tübingen.

July 4-10, 2022


More information